Cordell Hull Institute: Publications
Navigation Bar Mission Activities Publications Policy Forum Links Glossary Contact Home Page

Publications of the Cordell Hull Institute chiefly take the form of papers in the online Trade Policy Analyses series. These mostly arise out of the Institute's Trade Policy Roundtable meetings.  Some arise out of the Institute's occasional international roundtable meetings. In due course, the Institute intends to publish collections of essays, major studies and monographs.

 

Trade Policy Analyses

Below are listed the papers published in the online Trade Policy Analyses series that was begun in 1999.

Volume 8 (2006)

The Cordell Hull Institute co-sponsored a major conference on the WTO system in Beijing on May 22-24, 2006, principally convened by Cornell and Peking universities.  Senior officials from Chinese Ministry of Commerce took part.  The program, and a brief report, can be found in the Policy Forum section.  Posted here are some papers that were presented, those by Hugh Corbet, Bernard Hoekman, Barry Desker and Margaret Liang, John M. Weekes, Kym Anderson and Chulsu Kim.

Vol. 8, No. 16 Chulsu Kim, Chairman of the Institute for Trade and Investment, Seoul, former Deputy Director-General of the World Trade Organization, on "Dismantling Discrimination against Labor-intensive Manufactures" (May 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 15 Kym Anderson, Professor of Economics, University of Adelaide, and Lead Economist (Trade Policy), Development Research Group, at the World Bank, Washington, DC, on "Dismantling Discrimination in Agricultural Markets" (May 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 14 John  M. Weekes, Senior Policy Adviser at Sidley Austin, attorneys-at-law, Geneva, former Canadian Ambassador to the World Trade Organization and onetime Chairman, WTO General Council, on "Dismantling Discrimination in Manufactures and Services" (May 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 13 Barry Desker and Margaret Liang, Director and Adjunct Fellow, respectively, Institute of Defense and Strategic Studies, Nanyang University, Singapore, on "Prospects for Disciplining Preferential Trade Agreements" (May 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 12 Bernard Hoekman, Research Manager (Trade Policy), Development Research Group, at the World Bank, Washington, DC, on "Importance of the Principle of Non-discrimination in an Integrating World Economy" (May 2006)

 

Vol. 8, No. 11 Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on the "Role of the WTO System in Promoting a Stable Institutional Environment" (May2006)

Vol. 8, No. 10 Richard Self, Principal Associate for International Trade Policy, Nathan Associates Inc., development consultants, Arlington, VA on, “Energizing the Services Negotiations in the Doha Round” (April 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 9 Aaditya Mattoo, Lead Economist (International Trade), Development Research Group, World Bank, Washington, DC, on “Regulatory Authorities and the WTO Negotiations on Services” (April 2006)

 Vol. 8, No.    Vol. 8, No. 8 Sydney J. Key, Lecturer at Boston University Law School, and author of The Doha Round and Financial Services Negotiations (2003)  (April 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 7 William J. Martin, Lead Economist (Trade Policy), Development Research Group, at the World Bank, and co-director of the World Bank project on agricultural trade reform and the Doha Round negotiations, on “Trade Policy Reform & the Doha Development Agenda” (March 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 6 Russell Lamb, Associate Director at Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC, on “Reform of U.S. Farm Policy in an Integrating World Economy” (March 2006)

 

Vol. 8, No. 5 Daniel T. Griswold, Director of the Centre for Trade Policy Studies, Cato Institute, on Wreaking Environmental Harm, Another Case against Farm Subsidies” (March 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 4 Ralph Grossi, President of the American Farmland Trust, Washington, DC, "Enhancing the the U.S. Environment and Reducing the Incentive to Farm Marginal Land" (March 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 3 Mark Drabenstott, Vice President, and Director of the Center for the Study of Rural America ay the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, on “New Rural Economy and a New Role for Public Policy” (March 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 2 Robert L. Thompson, Gardner Professor of Agricultural Policy, University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, IL, and Chairman of the International Food & Agricultural Trade Policy Council, Washington, DC, on the “Agricultural Dimension of the Doha Round Negotiations” (January 2006)

Vol. 8, No. 1 Carlos Primo Braga, Senior Economic Adviser in Europe, International Trade Department, World Bank, on the “Development Dimension of the Doha Round Negotiations” (January 2006)

Volume 7 (2005)

The Columbia Square Building, designed by I.M. Pei, the location of the Washington office of Hogan & Hartson, attorneys-at-law, was where the Cordell Hull Institute held a Trade Policy Roundtable meeting on May 26, 2005, on a presentation by Kym Anderson setting out the conclusions of the major World Bank study on liberalizing agricultural trade.  The study has since been published as Kym Anderson and Will Martin (eds), Agricultural Trade Reform and the Doha Development Agenda (London and Washington, DC: Palgrave Macmillan and the World Bank, 2006)

Vol. 7, No. 7 - John Campbell, Vice President, Government Relations and Industrial Products, at Ag Processing Inc., Omaha, NE, on "The Next U.S. Farm Bill: Why Decoupled Payments to Farmers were Introduced" (November 2005)

Vol. 7, No. 6 – Hugo Paemen, Senior Adviser, Hogan & Hartson, Washington, DC, and former Permanent Representative of the European Commission in the United States, on “A 2005 Mid-Year State of the European Union” (July 2005)

Vol. 7, No. 5 – Robert L. Thompson, Gardner Professor of Agricultural Policy, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, and former Director of Agriculture and Rural Development, World Bank, Washington, DC, on "Essentials for the 2007 Farm Bill in a Global Context” (July 2005)

 

Vol. 7, No. 4 – Kym Anderson and Will Martin, Lead Economists (Trade Policy) in the Development Research Group, World Bank, Washington, DC, on “Agricultural Trade Liberalization in the Doha Round” (May 2005)

Vol. 7, No. 3 – Hans Peter Lankes, Chief of the Trade Policy Division, IMF, Washington, DC, "Preference Erosion on Middle-Income Developing Countries" (April 2005)

Vol. 7, No. 2 – Thomas Dalsgaard, Senior Economist in the Tax Policy Division, IMF, Washington, DC on "Developing Countries: Lessons from Trade Reform and Revenue Loss" (April 2005)

Vol. 7, No. 1 – Richard Eglin, Director of the Trade and Finance Division, WTO Secretariat, Geneva, on “What’s the State of Play in the Doha Round Negotiations?” (March 2005)

Volume 6 (2004)

As the Doha Round negotiations struggled to get traction, the Cordell Hull Institute and the Cornell Law School convened an international roundtable meeting in Paris on the role of the WTO system in the world economy.  It was held in the Panthéon-Sorbonne, near the Panthéon church, on July 9-10, 2004.  Reproduced here are four papers that were presented by Victoria Curzon Price, Stefan Tangerman, Agnes van Ardenne and Ernst-Ulrich Petersmann.

Vol. 6, No. 18 – John J. Barcelo III, W.N. Cromwell Professor of International and Comparative Law, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, on “Developing Countries and the WTO System” (October 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 17 – Douglas Oberhelman, Group President of Caterpillar Inc., Peoria, IL, on the “Direction of American Trade Policy – a Caterpillar View” (October 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 16 – Richard Newfarmer, Economic Advisor, International Trade Department and Prospects Group, World Bank, Washington, DC, on Coherence among WTO and Regional  Agreements” (October 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 15 – L. Alan Winters, Director of the Development Research Group, World Bank, Washington, DC, on the “Importance of the Principle of Non-discrimination” (October 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 14 – William A Reinsch, President of the National Foreign Trade Council, Washington, DC, on “Negotiations on Industrial Products and Services” (October 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 13 – Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on “State of the WTO System and the Doha Round Negotiations” (October 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 12 – Jagdish Bhagwati and Avind Panagarya, of Columbia University, New York, and T.N. Srinivasan, of Yale University, on “Flaws in the Outsourcing Debate” (September 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 11 – Charles E. Grassley, Chairman of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, Congress of the United States, on “Seven Essentials of United States Trade Policy” (July 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 10 – Ernst-Ulrich Petersmann, Professor of International Law, European University Institute, Florence, “On Reinforcing WTO Rules in Domestic Law” (July 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 9 – Agnes Van Ardenne, Netherlands Minister of Development Cooperation, on the “Development Dimension of the Doha Round Negotiations” (July 2004)

 

Vol. 6, No. 8 – Stefan Tangermann, Director of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries at the OECD, Paris, on “Overcoming Discrimination against Agricultural Exporters” (July 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 7 – Victoria Curzon Price, Professor of International Economics, University of Geneva, on the “Place of Non-discrimination in an Integrating World Economy” (July 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 6 – Harald B. Malmgren, former Deputy U.S. Trade Representative, on the “Post-Uruguay Round Difficulties in the WTO System” (June 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 5 – Richard Eglin, Director of the Trade and Finance Division, WTO Secretariat, Geneva, on “Time to Clarify the Role of the WTO System” (June 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 4 – Kenneth W. Dam, of the University of Chicago and the Brookings Institution, Washington, DC, on the “Significance of the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act [of 1934]” (June 2004)

 

Vol. 6, No. 3 – Liam McCreery, President of the Canadian Agri-Food Trade Alliance, Ottawa, on Dealing with Unfair Export Competition” (May 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 2 – Andrew Stoeckel, Executive Director, Centre for International Economics, Canberra, on the “Doha Round Priority of Cutting Border Protection” (May 2004)

Vol. 6, No. 1 – Clayton Yeutter, former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, and Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, on “Re-launching the Doha Round Negotiations in 2005” (May 2004)

Volume 5 (2003)

After a succession of missed deadlines in the Doha Round negotiating schedule, expectations for the WTO ministerial conference in Cancún, Mexico, in September 2003 were bound to be low – very low.  The Institute convened two meetings before the event and afterwards it held two post mortems, a meeting on competition and investment policy and a conference on getting the Doha Round on track.  Some of the papers are published in the online Trade Policy Analyses series - those of Richard Eglin, David Woods, Clayton Yeutter, High Corbet, John M. Weekes, Rubens Antonio Barbosa, Edward Menzies and Andrew Stoeckel.

Vol. 5, No. 15 - Andrew Stoeckel, Executive Director, Centre for International Economics, Canberra, on “Tackling the Political Problem of Farm Subsidies” (November 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 14 – Edward Menzies, then President of the Canadian Agri-Food Trade Alliance, Ottawa, on the “Need for Change in Canada’s Agri-food Trade Policy” (November 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 13 – Rubens Antonio Barbosa, then Brazilian Ambassador to the United States, on “Why the Group of 20 was ‘Suddenly’ Formed” (November 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 12 – Richard Rivers, former General Counsel, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, on the “Deadlines Imposed by the U.S. Trade-negotiating Authority” (November 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 11 – John M. Weekes, Senior Adviser at Sidley Austin Brown & Wood, Geneva, and former Canadian Ambassador to the WTO, on “What Happened in Cancún and the Implications” (September 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 10 – Kihwan Kim, Senior Adviser at Goldman Sachs Asia, Seoul, and former Korean Ambassador-at-Large for Economic Affairs, on “Tackling the Proliferation of Preferential Trade Agreements” (September 2003)

 

Vol. 5, No. 9 – Hugh Corbet, President, Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on “Breaking the WTO Impasse over Agriculture” (September 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 8 – Clayton Yeutter, Of Counsel at Hogan & Hartson, Washington, DC, and former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, on “Cancún – the Heavy Lifting Lies Ahead” (September 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 7 – David Woods, Managing Director of World Trade Agenda Consultants, Geneva, on “Prospects for Cancún and the Doha Round Negotiations” (September 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 6 – Richard Eglin, Director of the Trade and Finance Division, WTO Secretariat, Geneva, on “Trade and Investment in the WTO System” (August 2003)

 

Vol. 5, No. 5 – Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on the Role of Rules in the WTO System” (July 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 4 – Chuck Hagel, the senior U.S. Senator from Nebraska, on the “Relevance of Cordell Hull’s Legacy to Today” (May 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 3 – John M. Weekes, Senior Adviser at Sidley Austin Brown & Wood, Geneva, and former Canadian Ambassador to the WTO, “State of Affairs in the Doha Round Negotiations” (May 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 2 – Robert L. Thompson, Chairman of the International Food and Agricultural Trade Policy Council, Washington, DC, on the “Moment of Truth on the Liberalization of Farm Trade" (April 2003)

Vol. 5, No. 1 – Peter D. Sutherland, Chairman of BP Plc and Goldman Sachs International, London, on “Avoiding Stalemate in the Doha Round Negotiations” (April 2003)

Volume 4 (2002)

 

Rio de Janeiro in Brazil was where the Cordell Hull Institute and the Centro Brasileiro de Relações Internacionais held, in the Palácio Itamaraty, an international roundtable meeting on liberalizing agricultural trade on October 14-16, 2003.  It was attended by 35 senior officials and independent experts from the United States, Australia and other Cairns Group countries, including the chief agriculture negotiators of Argentina, Australia, Brazil, New Zealand and Uruguay.  Below is the chairman's statement by John Weekes issued after the meeting.

 

Vol. 4, No. 6 - John M. Weekes, Chairman of the Global Trade Practice, APCO Worldwide Inc., Geneva, former Canadian Ambassador to the World Trade Organization and onetime Chairman of the WTO General Council, on a "Global Strategy for Liberalizing Agricultural Trade" (October 2002)

Vol. 4, No. 5 – Clayton Yeutter, Of Counsel at Hogan & Hartson, Washington, DC, and former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, on “Opportunity of a Century to Liberalize Farm Trade” (May 2002)

Vol. 4, No. 4 – John M. Weekes, Senior Adviser at Sidley Austin Brown & Wood, Geneva, and former Canadian Ambassador to the WTO, on Strengthening the WTO’s Oversight, Dispute Settlement and Negotiating Functions (April 2002)

Vol. 4, No. 3 – Stuart Harbinson, Director of the Director-General’s Office, WTO Secretariat, and former Chairman of the WTO General Council, on the “Lessons from the Launching of the Doha Round Negotiations” (April 2002)

 

Vol. 4, No. 2 – Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on “The Future of the Multilateral Trading System”, (March 2002)

Vol. 4, No. 1 – Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on “Launching the Doha Round on Two Tracks and Developing the WTO System” (March 2002)

Volume 3 (2001)

 

As part of the consensus-building effort to launch the first WTO round of multilateral trade negotiations, the Cordell Hull Institute convened an international roundtable meeting in Gotemba, at the foot of Mount Fuji, on September 8-10, 2001. The meeting, hosted by the Government of Japan, was attended by 34 senior officials and independent experts, mostly from the Asian-Pacific region.  Below is the chairman's statement by Ambassador John M. Weekes that was issued after the meeting.

Vol. 3, No. 10 – Kenneth Heydon, OECD Deputy Director for Trade, on “Is China Profiting from its Low Labor Standards?” (December 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 9 – William D. Rogers, Senior Partner at Arnold & Porter, attorneys-at-law, Washington, DC, on “Mounting a Global Dialogue on the Trade-and-Labor Issue” (December 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 8 – Gary N. Horlick, partner at Wilmer Cutler & Pickering, attorneys-at-law, Washington, DC, on “Would Trade Sanctions Work? Confusing Sanctions with Trade Remedies” (December 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 7 – Herwig Schlögl, Deputy Secretary-General of the OECD, Paris, on “An International Perspective on Trade and Labor Standards” (December 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 6 – Daniel W. Drezner, of the University of Chicago, on “Fears of a Race to the Bottom. Why Aren’t They Justified?" (December 2001)

 

Vol. 3, No. 5 – Jagdish Bhagwati, Lehmann Professor of Economics, University of Columbia, New York, on “Enforceable Labor Standards. What’s Wrong with the Idea?” (December 2001)

 

 

Vol. 3, No. 4 – V.N. Balasubramanyam, Professor of Developement Economics, University of Lancaster, England, on “Extending the WTO System to Foreign Direct Investment” (November 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 3 – John M. Weekes, Chairman of the Global Trade Practice, APCO Worldwide Inc., Geneva, and former Canadian Ambassador to the WTO, on “Facing the Challenge in the WTO System” (September 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 2 – Harald B. Malmgren, President of the Malmgren Group, Warrenton, VA, and former Deputy U.S. Trade Representative, on “Moving Ahead in the World Trading System” (June 2001)

Vol. 3, No. 1 – William J. Davey, of the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, and former Director of the Legal Affairs Division, WTO Secretariat, on the “Reform of the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Procedures (May 2001)

Volume 2 (2000)

 

Soon after the "Seattle fiasco" (the WTO ministerial conference in December 1999) the Cordell Hull Institute organized a symposium on Protectionism in a Booming Economy for the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association, Tokyo.  The papers were published in the February 2000 number of The JAMA Forum. Here are reproduced two of the contributions, by Hugh Corbet and Victoria Curzon Price, to the symposium.

Vol. 2, No. 5 Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on “Restoring Momentum in the WTO System after the U.S. Elections” (September 2000)

Vol. 2, No. 4 – L.  Alan Winters, Professor of Economics at the University of Sussex, Brighton, England, on “Food Security. An Old Argument all Over Again” (August 2000)

Vol. 2, No. 3 – Victoria Curzon Price, Professor of International Economics, University of Geneva, on “Putting 'Ethical' Protectionism and its Proponents in Perspective” (July 2000)

 

Vol. 2, No. 2 Richard  Eglin, Director of the Trade and Finance Division, WTO Secretariat, Geneva, on “Multilateral Rules for Foreign Direct Investment” (April 2000) 

Vol. 2, No. 1 – Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on “Post Mortem on Seattle: Mistakes were Made” (March 2000)

Volume 1 (1999)

 

At the WTO ministerial conference in Seattle on December 1-6, 1999, the Cordell Hull Institute and the Centre for International Economics, based in Canberra, convened a briefing conference for the Cairns Group Farm Leaders, attended by over 450 participants from NGOs, governments, farm groups and manufacturing interests.  Reproduced here are four of the presentation those by Clayton Yeutter, Robert E. Litan, Andrew Stoeckel and Hugh Corbet.

Vol. 1, No. 9 – Hugh Corbet, President of the Cordell Hull Institute, Washington, DC, on the “Shape of a Comprehensive WTO Round” (December 1999)

Vol. 1, No. 8 Andrew Stoeckel, Executive Director of the Centre for International Economics, Canberra, on “Removing the Hidden Taxes on Exports” (December 2000)

Vol. 1, No. 7 – Robert E. Litan, then Vice President and Director of Economic Studies, Brookings Institution, Washington, DC, on “Moving Towards an Open World Economy” (December 1999)

Vol. 1, No. 6 – Clayton Yeutter, Of Counsel at Hogan & Hartson, Scotsdale, AZ, and former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, on the “Critical Role of the Cairns Group in Liberalizing Agricultural Trade” (November 1999)

Vol. 1, No. 5 – J. Michael Finger, Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, on “Implementation Problems in the Uruguay Round Agreements” (September 1999)

Vol. 1, No. 4 – Richard Eglin, Director of the Trade and Finance Division, WTO Secretariat, Geneva, on “Labor Standards, Human Rights and Other Issues in the WTO” (July 1999)

Vol. 1, No. 3 – Lawrence Eagleburger, former U.S. Secretary of State, on the “Need to Build a New Consensus on Trade and Investment” (July 1999) 

Vol. 1, No. 2 – Richard Eglin, Director of the Trade and Finance Division, WTO Secretariat, Geneva, on “Links Among Trade, Finance and Development” (April 1999)

Vol. 1, No. 1 – Harald B. Malmgren, President of the Malmgren Group, Warrenton, VA, and former Deputy U.S. Trade Representative, on the “Growing Urgent Need for Renewed U.S. Leadership in the WTO” (January 1999)

To receive occasional updates on the Institute's activities, please click here.

Cartoon by KAL, now of The Economist, on the cover of Rolf Langhammer and André Sapir, Economic Impact of Generalized Tariff Preferences (Aldershot, Brookfield and Sydney: Gower, for the Trade Policy Research Centre, 1987).

"Preferences sound attractive and generous; and the poor countries have accepted them as such. But this has been a mistake. There is no good substitute for the MFN reduction of tariff barriers in the rich countries. It should go hand-in-hand with enhanced technical and financial assistance. By focusing this assistance preferentially on the poor countries, the poor should be able to exploit the trade opportunities that are opened up for them by non-preferential [tariff] treatment. This is the only way ahead"

— JAGDISH BHAGWATI, "The
Poor's Best Hope", The Economist,
London, 22 June 2002

 

Evolution of the International Economic Order

Jan Tumlir, Director of Economic Research and Analysis at the GATT Secretariat, took early retirement in 1985 to work at the University of California at Los Angeles on his magnum opus, which he had only just begun, but he suddenly passed away. On the basis of the copious notes he left, and a few early drafts of chapters, Hugh Corbet has been reviewing his papers and compiling the volume Tumlir had in mind.

"Tumlir’s writings on political economy came relatively late in life and are mostly in the form of articles, contributions to edited volumes and policy papers, without a single, fully elaborated book to his name. His publications were packed into less than a decade of work (from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s)…

"During that period his output became ever more substantial and his ‘take’ on the international economic order became ever clearer, sharper, more comprehensive and, finally, very distinctive. Indeed, it is very difficult to think of any contemporary who even approximates the range and quality of Tumlir’s classical liberal approach to questions of international economic order…"

— RAZEEN SALLY, Classical
Liberalism and International Economic Order
(London and New York: Routledge, 1998).

Dr Sally reviews the work of political economists from the Scottish Enlightenment school, notably David Hume and Adam Smith, to Frank Knight and Jacob Viner in the United States, to the Ordnungpolitik school in Germany, among them Walter Euken, Franz Böhme and Wilhelm Röpke, and thence to Jan Tumlir on whom he devotes a chapter.

This adaptation of Aesop's fable about The Ox and Frog, its moral being that men are ruined by attempting a greatness at which they have no chance, became famous in Britain as protectionists resisted the free trade momentum that developed with the success of Richard Cobden's Anti-Corn Law League in securing the Repeal of the Corn Laws, which led to the Cobden-Chevalier Treaty of 1860, the basis for the system of bilateral commercial treaties (the système des traités) that prevailed in Europe and beyond until World War I.

Not since then has there been as good an opportunity as in the Doha Round negotiations, launched in November 2002, to restore the momentum in favor of liberalizing agricultural trade that was lost in the 1920s with the failure of governments to restore the système des traités or establish a multilateral trade regime.